‘Rhinos don’t eat pancakes’ and being a listening mum

That was one of our books from the library this fortnight: Rhinos don’t eat pancakes, by Anna Kemp. The premise is that Daisy’s parents never listen to her, so they miss the fact that she is telling them that a huge, purple, pancake-eating rhino has taken up residence in their home.

My 4 year old rather likes it. So do I. But, and I might be being over-sensitive, I was also a little dismayed. Maybe because I’m not sure I want my son to have the negative thought pattern, ‘no one listens to me’. Maybe because it made me think about whether or not I am currently doing a good job of listening to him.

Listening, and communicating, is something I consider to be very important. It’s a way of showing care and respect for someone, and something my children deserve as much as anyone else. I try to stop what I am doing and focus on Zeph when he speaks to me, to show him that I am listening and that he and what he has to say is valuable to me. I try not to give him vague pat-answers like yes sweetie, that’s nice, or I think so because I am distracted and haven’t really thought about what he is saying. I try to answer all the four year old questions born out of insatiable curiosity and why why why. I try to repeat myself five times without taking an irritated tone when he repeatedly asks me what?

I try.

Some days I do better than others.

I want to be a listening mum.

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4 thoughts on “‘Rhinos don’t eat pancakes’ and being a listening mum

  1. We all have some days that are better than others. The very fact that you stop what you’re doing to listen means you’re doing it well. ā¤ļø even now that my girls are older they’ll try to talk to me from the other room while I’m doing something. I sometimes have to tell them that I want to hear what they’re saying but they have to wait until I’m finished whatever it is (usually making dinner). Sometimes they’ll still carry on while I’m distracted and something that they’ll say will hit me and I’ll stop and look at them….”wait, what?” So I completely get the whole rhino thing…I might have to go find that book. šŸ˜‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. šŸ˜Š I sometimes ask him to wait to speak too… especially if I am speaking to someone else. Or ask him to wait for me to finish something before coming to help or do things together – that is also partly about respectig

      Liked by 1 person

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